Hypnotherapy – Frequently Asked Questions about hypnotherapy

Frequently asked questions about hypnotherapy

 

With this page we have tried to put together comprehensive but straightforward  answers to questions people often ask about hypnotherapy.  As with the rest of this website, our aim has been to be fair and factual.

If after reading this FAQ page and the rest of our website, you still have unanswered questions we will be happy to respond to any inquiries.  You can contact us by phoning 0118 988 5519  or emailing from our  Contact Page


What is hypnosis?

So what is hypnotherapy?

What benefits can hypnotherapy offer?

Is hypnotherapy ever inappropriate or contraindicated?

How long is each session - and how many sessions will I need?

Can anyone be hypnotised?

Do I lose control when I am in hypnosis?

What are your qualifications?

Are your therapists professionally insured?

Should I tell my GP that I am undergoing therapy – and do I require a referral from my doctor?

Could I become stuck in trance and not come out?

While in hypnosis could I be made to reveal private or confidential  issues?

Are there conditions when hypnotherapy is contra-indicated?


What is hypnosis?

A: That's the $64,000 question and the honest answer is no one can give a definite definition. But the most common and widely used description is that it is an "altered state of awareness" which most people experience as pleasantly relaxing, similar to day dreaming or when you watching a film and become so involved you are not really aware of anything else. What is known is that we each have an autonomic nervous system which regulates our body's key functions not under conscious control including internal organs such as the heart. That autonomic nervous system can itself be influenced through words, suggestions and visual images, especially while someone is in a state of hypnosis. This is when a person's subconscious can be influenced and helped to deal with thoughts, feelings and behaviur differently. For more detailed information click HERE

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So what is hypnotherapy?

A: This is the use of hypnosis as a therapeutic tool, based on the belief our minds and bodies do not work in isolation and that during hypnosis it is possible to influence both physical and mental responses. So it is important to understand hypnosis is not a therapy in itself. Therapy is offered while the client/patient is experiencing a deep state of relaxation and while the mind is relaxed and focused. This can also help the therapist to identify the core of a problem. Hypnotherapy helps to alleviate symptoms then assists the client to change by the use of positive suggestions.

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What benefits can hypnotherapy offer?

A: Many from helping you relax and let go of tension to dealing with deep-seated phobias, obsessions, emotional and other psychological issues or ending unwanted habits. It can assist in building your self-confidence and self-esteem to. For a fuller list of conditions which hypnotherapy can be used to deal with tap HERE

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Is hypnotherapy ever inappropriate or contraindicated?

A: Yes in some cases. Though hypnotherapy is an entirely appropriate, highly beneficial form of treatment for a wide range of problems, especially psychosomatic and stress-related disorders, it is not suitable for very young children or for people with dementia or for anyone while under the influence of drugs or alcohol. It is also contraindicated for a number of conditions. These include schizophrenia and, in many cases, clinical depression and bipolar conditions. Hypnotherapy may also be contra indicated for post traumatic stress disorders although teaching PTSD patients self-hypnosis can be beneficial. Epilepsy is also a condition where hypnotherapy should not be offered without the specific approval of the patient's own doctor.  For more information about contraindictions click HERE

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How long is each session - and how many sessions will I need?

A: The first appointment, where there will be a lot of note taking and plenty of chances for you to ask questions, will probably last up to an hour and a half.   Subsequent appointments are an hour - but may go a little longer if it seems necessary and helpful. For more details click on APPOINTMENTS & FEES

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Can anyone be hypnotised?

A: Most people have little if any difficulty going into a hypnotic trance or a "focused state of attention."   The few exceptions are usually those who see it as a 'battle of wills' between themselves and the therapist. However it can be difficult or even impossible for those who are significantly below average intelligence or who suffer dementia and are unable to concentrate and focus their thoughts. There are also some conditions where hypnotherapy is usually regarded as inappropriate or contraindicated.  For more information about contraindictions click HERE

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Do I lose control when I am in hypnosis?

A: No - not at all – all hypnosis is self-hypnosis. In fact one of the tenets of the Therapy Partnership's practice is the importance of helping clients develop greater awareness of their ability to control their own lives and develop a sense of being "in control". In most case people undergoing hypnotherapy are aware of their surroundings, can hear sounds around them, including of course, the hypnotherapist's voice. What often surprises people when fully alert after hypnosis is how much time has passed.

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What are your qualifications?

A: All of the Therapy Partnership's hypnotherapists were trained at the London College of Clinical Hypnosis, now recognised as among Britain's foremost hypnotherapy training centres, having been accredited by the British Accreditation Council, the Open University, Thames Valley University, Greenwich University and the Royal College of Nursing. It provides tuition for major teaching hospitals, including Guy's and St Thomas and St Bart's. Both attained Advanced Diplomas in Clinical Hypnotherapy and have subsequently gone on to extend their qualifications.

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Are your therapists professionally insured?

A: Yes. All the therapists linked to the Therapy Partnership must and do have full professional insurance.

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Should I tell my GP that I am undergoing therapy – and do I require a referral from my doctor?

A: Though you do not need a referral from your GP nor do you have to let your doctor know you are receiving therapy, often the Therapy Partnership would like permission to write to your doctor, especially if you are already receiving medical treatment for your condition. We believe it is a matter of good clinical practice and courtesy to inform your doctor what therapy is being offered.   But a letter will only be sent with your expressed permission – and the decision whether or not to give that permission, is entirely up to you. Your confidentiality is always guaranteed. However we cannot provide therapy to help asthma patients control their condition without permission to write to the patient's doctor or asthma clinic.

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Could I become stuck in trance and not come out?

A: Definitely not. Such a fear is totally unfounded; such an occurrence has never happened and could not happen.   At the end of a session you will become fully alert, usually feeling wonderfully relaxed, often with a great sense of fulfilment.  

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While in hypnosis could I be made to reveal private or confidential issues?

A: No, that does not happen. While in hypnosis no one can force or trick you into doing or saying anything you would not wish to when fully alert. Of course private, sometimes intimate matters, do often affect clients' conditions but that something discussed only while out of trance at the client's own choosing.

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This page was last updated  | 24th January 2016